Creative And Active Activities for Psalm 91

Creative Activity

Prepare: Have kids sit in a line. Starting with the back of the line, have a volunteer, use only their finger, to draw a simple object on the first kids back. The kid that was “drawn” on will then draw on the person in front of them, what they think was drawn on them. And continue to the front of the line where they will try to guess what they believe to be the object. Have the front go into the back and do it all over again.

Objects: Cloud, flower, star, heart, Christmas tree, diamond, letter of the alphabet

Talk about: Psalm 91:2 say’s ”I will say of the Lord, ‘He is my refuge and my fortress, my God, in whom I trust.’” Could you trust the person behind you? Why or why not?

Though we can’t see God, nor know what He is doing in our life, we can always trust God. He is our fortress, our rock.

Active Activity

Prepare: Divide the kids into two teams, or have the kids versus the teens. Each team will take a turn building and a turn destroying.

Objects: table, blocks (larger the better), bean bags, timer

Do: We are going to play a game in rounds. The first round, Team A will build the most reliable fortress they can in 2 minutes. When time is up, Team B will have one throw per person to knock down as many blocks as possible. Then we will switch, as Team B will build and Team will knock down. Team with the most blocks at the end of the two rounds will be victorious.

Talk about: Psalm 91:2 say’s ”I will say of the Lord, ‘He is my refuge and my fortress, my God, in whom I trust.’” Could you trust the building structures you made? Why or Why not?

Though our buildings will fall, our God will stand forever. That is why we can trust in Him!

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River Relay KidMin Activity

Bible Connect: Exodus 1 – 2:10
Best for Kindergarten and up

Supplies: Basket

Prepare: Make sure to have a medium to large open space. Have the children line up in a straight line facing all in one direction.

Do: Talk to the kids about waves and imagine the basket with baby Moses going down the river. Imagine the basket going up and down the waves of the Nile river. In this activity, the basket is going to over their head to the person behind them; then they run back to the end of the line. The person with the basket now passes it between their legs, then runs back to the back of the line.

So the basket goes over then under, over then under, and with the kids going to the back of the line, this activity can keep going all over the room.

Some extra ideas: 1) Lead the kids to the storytelling area. 2) Time the kids 3) Put a baby doll and make sure they don’t drop the baby

Talk about: Did baby Moses know about God’s protection? How did God protect baby Moses? How can God protect us today?

If you have any additional ideas, let me know.  I did this activity with 4s and 5s, and it was doable.  It took awhile to explain, but when it got going, the kids really enjoyed it.

Being Too Hard On My Boys

This past weekend was a memorial service for a beloved member of the church that I serve. Even though I haven’t been at the church any more than a year, it was nice to hear the stories of life served faithfully to the Lord. Not only faithfully, but with so much joy toward his friends and family.

It made me think of my memorial service someday and how my family will remember me when I am gone. Will they remember me as a person filled with joy and happiness or just a grump?

I say that because I know that I can be too hard on my children. I only know this to be true, because my wife lets me know and I am thankful for a spouse who isn’t afraid of honesty and letting me know that I am not fair with my boys.

The problem that I have with my children is that my expectation may be too high at times for their maturity level. It’s a mixture of my lack of patience with their mistakes and thinking too much into the future.

I came across a Bible story that I have read so much that sometimes I skim through it. But this time I looked a little closer.

It’s the story of the prodigal son. And I want to look more closely at verse 17-20.

But when he (the son) came to himself, he said, ‘How many of my father’s hired servants have more than enough bread, but I perish here with hunger! 18 I will arise and go to my father, and I will say to him, “Father, I have sinned against heaven and before you. 19 I am no longer worthy to be called your son. Treat me as one of your hired servants.” ’ 20 And he arose and came to his father. But while he was still a long way off, his father saw him and felt compassion, and ran and embraced him and kissed him (ESV)

Something that I didn’t notice is that the son isn’t sorry for what he did. The story doesn’t show or tell of the son’s remorse for his mistakes; it only says that he noticed he was hungry and his father’s servants eat better food than what he is currently eating. So he comes up with a sappy speech to give to his dad.

Have you ever practiced a speech? If you have, you know prepared statements are not typically sincere. A prepared statement usually is trying to convince someone to act on something. Maybe you wanted to sell something? Perhaps you seek to win an argument? Sometimes it could be to show honesty or love, but not always. I don’t practice good loving speeches to my wife because you feel the words.

The son was not giving a feeling speech; he was trying to convince his father to hire him as a servant.

But the father does something that I have a hard time doing with my children when they make stupid mistakes. The father doesn’t ask the son anything the why? The father embraces and loves.

If this were me, I would have asked some questions? Maybe would have the least waited for an honest apology. But the father just embraces and loves.

What I take from this story, is that maybe I need to love first my children when they make mistakes. Instead of waiting for remorse, I should embrace them before they can go into their practiced speech.

Treating Your Children Differently

Wouldn’t it be great if we could get a glimpse of our children’s future? Like if you knew some of your child’s negative qualities. Man, wouldn’t that make parenting a little bit easier? You would have at least some areas to work on throughout the years. Because let’s be honest parenting is like walking through a fog in a dense corn field. You have a good idea what direction you want to go, but you don’t know until it’s all over how far you were off the mark.

Not only can you not predict the future, but living with your children every day, makes it harder to see negative qualities. I know concerned, informed, and proactive parents, that cannot see the negative qualities of their children. Even I, a person that works with kids, studies parenting books and adolescent development, do not see the negative qualities of my children.

As a parent, I know my job is to make sure I lead my kids into adulthood as a fully functional member of society. As a Christian parent, I know my job is to lead them to know God’s will for their life and to put them in situations where they can use their spiritual gifts on a regular basis.

The first step in this is to know and recognize that even though my children share my DNA, they are not carbon copies of me. Sure we have similar quirks and mannerisms. They are not me. Each of my kids deserves a shot to be their own individual. I need to recognize that truth because will make parenting a more enjoyable process.

I think if we can recognize our children’s differences, which gives us a good blueprint to start with in raising out children to adulthood.

After that, parenting is trial and error, and I hope and pray every day that my kids grow up as devoted followers of Christ and quality adults.

Teaching Etiquette During Developmental Stages of Childhood

The last two weeks Awesome Etiquette (a podcast I highly recommend) had a post script segment by Cindy Post Senning on six developmental stages of childhood and what you can expect regarding teaching etiquette to them.  These postscripts are a great listen and very informational. The first three stages start around the 41-minute mark of episode 126, and the last three stages start around the 38-minute mark.

Episode 126

https://www.omnycontent.com/w/player/?orgId=9beac001-e6e2-4769-95cd-a6dd015651f6&programId=ff5b24cf-94b4-4a1a-9a11-a6e20106e0e4&clipId=a19d00d5-6199-42d4-97e9-a7110145d6ec

Episode 127

https://www.omnycontent.com/w/player/?orgId=9beac001-e6e2-4769-95cd-a6dd015651f6&programId=ff5b24cf-94b4-4a1a-9a11-a6e20106e0e4&clipId=fc681adc-5b61-4f82-9884-a719000e4857

How To Change The “No” To A Positive Conversation

If you are a parent, you have said the word, “no” to your child.  Some of you say “no” on a hourly basis.  A few of you probably say “no” as soon your child begins to ask.  And there might be  a person out there who say’s “no” the minute the child wakes up.

There isn’t a problem with saying the word “no.”  We don’t want our children to get everything and anything they want.  Part of being a parent is setting boundaries for our children.

So when our child comes into the room and asks “can I juggle sharp knives while jumping on the bed?”  I am hoping everyone who reads this blog would agree that this is definitely a “no” answer.

Despite the need to use the word “no” I’m guessing some of us get tired of saying it, and are tired of the negativity. Well, we can change the “no” answer to a positive by taking a few extra steps.

Here is some sample speech you can use to change the “no” to a positive.

The first thing thing you do is start with a “yes” before giving the “no.”

Child: Dad, can I juggle sharp knives while jumping on the bed?

Me: Well, son you can juggle some balls, but let’s stay away from the knives and I would appreciate you not jumping on your bed.

Suggesting the option of juggling with balls was the “yes” in this example. When you start with a yes, it confirms that you are listening to your child and keeps the child engaged in the conversation.  Once you say, “no” it automatically makes a person shut down or if your child is young, opens the door for them to have a tantrum.

Start with a “yes,” then give the “why” if needed.

Child: Dad, can I juggle sharp knives while jumping on the bed?

Me: Well, son you can juggle some balls, but let’s stay away from the knives and I would appreciate you not jumping on your bed.

Child: Why can’t I use knives or jump on the bed?

Me: Thank you for asking. Juggling is okay but knives are very dangerous.  And it is my job to keep you safe.

Adding these two responses before the automatic “no,” will help your relationship with your child.  When you’re in auto mode, The conversation shuts down and could, after a while, shut down conversations on more serious issues. But the “yes” method shows the child that you are engaged.

The best part of the “yes” before “no” is you can practice this method every day, because as we all know, your child asks you plenty of questions.

 

 

 

 

New Beginnings – Same Vision

This past weekend at Northwest Church, I had the opportunity to address the church a little bit about the vision of the Children’s Ministry and how we are going to work with parents in providing Intentional Family Experiences for our families.   It’s a new challenge for the church and me, and I am eager to see how I can implement these experiences to a larger church than I originally started the program with back in Michigan.

You can check out the video of the service at Northwest Church Facebook Page

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